The Rhubarb Harvest is Coming In

Rhubarb

 

Seven quarts of rhubarb are in the freezer already and what’s cooking on the stove right now should add at least seven more. All that is from six plants lightly harvested. Last year’s rhubarb harvest of 35 quarts made it until mid-May, almost twelve months. I eat rhubarb nearly every day on wild rice or parched corn. It also gets added to soups in place of vinegar and sometimes in cakes and cookies to make them moist. With so much rhubarb this year I may try making a batch of wine from the stalks.

 

Rhubarb

15 thoughts on “The Rhubarb Harvest is Coming In

    1. Its pretty easy to grow so long as you have winter weather with temperatures below freezing for a few months. Rhubarb is a long-lived perennial so the soil should be enriched with lots of compost and organic matter. Give it plenty of sun.

      I just finished making my 46th quart of sauce today. Six more and that’s a quart a week, enough for a year!

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  1. I watched a TV programme about “forced” rhubarb in Yorkshire and I know it’s very tender and delicious and all, but it seemed a little bit .. ah I dunno. Cruel Yes cruel to deprive the poor thing of light for most of its growing life. I’d rather yank it straight out the ground. Well, if I can finally grow some. .

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    1. Yep, I read about that too. Seems once the roots are forced that’s it for them. I suppose they could be re-planted in the spring. Its something I may try this winter with a few pots in the basement.

      Can rhubarb grow outside where you are?

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      1. The environment where I live is perfect for almost everything, sorta Mediterranean, although my soil is clay/slate. We get plenty of sunshine and no frost. I put some seeds in a shaded area near my water tap and a few in a pot for transplanting. We’re going into winter here in South Africa, and it’s winter rainfall, but it’s nothing like what you guys have to put up with. .

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          1. We’re looking at between 10-15 centigrade in winter. Summer doesn’t get very hot, probably maximum 25 C. I do have a lovely shaded piece on the west side of my house that’s very cool and sheltered. I’m thinking this might be the spot, but I’ve only been here 2 months so I might not know what I’m talking about.

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              1. I have a large expanse of flat ground, so I reckon my only choice to grow a variety of things is creating microclimates with hard landscaping. My west side is lovely and cool, between the house and a very robust honeysuckle. I might need to wait until spring to get something going, but I see no harm in starting now since it’s so mild. My mum had very healthy rhubarb in an area which got much hotter. I love eating it so much, it’s worth the effort I think.

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                1. Definitely worth the effort. There are species that grow in the warm parts of the Himalayas. Also a species (Rheum palmatum) that grows in warmer areas of China. Many modern rhubarbs are hybrids of two or more species so I’d expect a wide range of adaptability especially if you are using seeds. If you can get some cooler micro-climate in your yard all the better.

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                  1. This is an amazing area for farms, it’s mostly grain, cattle and sheep, olives, berries and vineyards. Almost anything grows here. I have the healthiest agave ever. Best of all possible worlds, so if I can add rhubarb to the mix, that would be fan-tastic.

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                    1. The ancient Greeks (Mediterranean climate zone) used to get dried rhubarb roots from an area “beyond the Bosporus” where that exactly was is uncertain.

                      But try it anyway it might work.

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